Mapping a classification system to architectural education: Investigating the relevance of classification systems in creative education

Anders Hermund, Lars Klint, Nicolai Rostrup

Publications: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This paper examines to what extent a new classification system, Cuneco Classification System, CCS, proves useful in the education of architects, and to what degree the aim of an architectural education, rather based on an arts and crafts approach than a polytechnic approach, benefits from the distinct terminology of the classification system. The method used to examine the relationship between education, practice and the CCS bifurcates in a quantitative and a qualitative exploration: Quantitative comparison of the curriculum with the students’ own descriptions of their studies through a questionnaire survey among 88 students in graduate school. Qualitative interviews with a handful of practicing architects, to be able to cross check the relevance of the education with the profession. The examination indicates the need of a new definition, in addition to the CCS’s scale, covering the earliest phases of architectural work. This paper will suggest a possible approach to these revisions of the CCS
Original languageEnglish
Publication dateDec 2015
Number of pages10
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2015
EventInternational Conference of the Architectural Science Association - The Architectural Science Association, Melbourne, Australia
Duration: 2 Dec 20154 Dec 2015
Conference number: 49

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference of the Architectural Science Association
Number49
LocationThe Architectural Science Association
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period02/12/201504/12/2015

Artistic research

  • No

Cite this

Hermund, A., Klint, L., & Rostrup, N. (2015). Mapping a classification system to architectural education: Investigating the relevance of classification systems in creative education. Paper presented at International Conference of the Architectural Science Association, Melbourne, Australia.