ARE INCLUSIVE DESIGNERS DESIGNING INCLUSIVELY?

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

A large body of literature exists relating to Inclusive Design. The literature can be divided into theory concerning methodology and case studies concerning practice. With such a large body of theoretical literature available, the question arises as to how closely practice matches that theory. This paper is a survey of the methods used in the execution of self-declared inclusively design products based on an analysis of academic papers, posters and oral presentations. The case studies are divided into two groups, product design and assistive technology. Design steps were assigned to six categories of activity conforming to an authoritative design method. Analysis of the result showed that of the 66 cases, 4.5% reported carrying out all six categories of activity. 39.3% carried out or reported just one step. The study also found that the predominant focus of reported design activity is in the initial steps of user investigation but the subsequent activities receive less emphasis due to either under-reporting or non-completion. The work shows that design practitioners need to resist the tendency for user input to taper off as projects proceed.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftDesign Journal
Vol/bind16
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)pp 138-158
Antal sider20
ISSN1460-6925
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jun. 2013

Emneord

  • Inclusive Design
  • assistive technology
  • design methods

Kunstnerisk udviklingsvirksomhed (KUV)

  • Nej

Citer dette

@article{621132e0a43c4f6490d338954ae1383f,
title = "ARE INCLUSIVE DESIGNERS DESIGNING INCLUSIVELY?",
abstract = "A large body of literature exists relating to Inclusive Design. The literature can be divided into theory concerning methodology and case studies concerning practice. With such a large body of theoretical literature available, the question arises as to how closely practice matches that theory. This paper is a survey of the methods used in the execution of self-declared inclusively design products based on an analysis of academic papers, posters and oral presentations. The case studies are divided into two groups, product design and assistive technology. Design steps were assigned to six categories of activity conforming to an authoritative design method. Analysis of the result showed that of the 66 cases, 4.5{\%} reported carrying out all six categories of activity. 39.3{\%} carried out or reported just one step. The study also found that the predominant focus of reported design activity is in the initial steps of user investigation but the subsequent activities receive less emphasis due to either under-reporting or non-completion. The work shows that design practitioners need to resist the tendency for user input to taper off as projects proceed.",
keywords = "assitive technology, inclusive design, design methods, Inclusive Design, assistive technology, design methods",
author = "Richard Herriott",
year = "2013",
month = "6",
doi = "10.2752/175630613X13584367984820",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "pp 138--158",
journal = "Design Journal",
issn = "1460-6925",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

ARE INCLUSIVE DESIGNERS DESIGNING INCLUSIVELY? / Herriott, Richard.

I: Design Journal, Bind 16, Nr. 2, 06.2013, s. pp 138-158.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - ARE INCLUSIVE DESIGNERS DESIGNING INCLUSIVELY?

AU - Herriott, Richard

PY - 2013/6

Y1 - 2013/6

N2 - A large body of literature exists relating to Inclusive Design. The literature can be divided into theory concerning methodology and case studies concerning practice. With such a large body of theoretical literature available, the question arises as to how closely practice matches that theory. This paper is a survey of the methods used in the execution of self-declared inclusively design products based on an analysis of academic papers, posters and oral presentations. The case studies are divided into two groups, product design and assistive technology. Design steps were assigned to six categories of activity conforming to an authoritative design method. Analysis of the result showed that of the 66 cases, 4.5% reported carrying out all six categories of activity. 39.3% carried out or reported just one step. The study also found that the predominant focus of reported design activity is in the initial steps of user investigation but the subsequent activities receive less emphasis due to either under-reporting or non-completion. The work shows that design practitioners need to resist the tendency for user input to taper off as projects proceed.

AB - A large body of literature exists relating to Inclusive Design. The literature can be divided into theory concerning methodology and case studies concerning practice. With such a large body of theoretical literature available, the question arises as to how closely practice matches that theory. This paper is a survey of the methods used in the execution of self-declared inclusively design products based on an analysis of academic papers, posters and oral presentations. The case studies are divided into two groups, product design and assistive technology. Design steps were assigned to six categories of activity conforming to an authoritative design method. Analysis of the result showed that of the 66 cases, 4.5% reported carrying out all six categories of activity. 39.3% carried out or reported just one step. The study also found that the predominant focus of reported design activity is in the initial steps of user investigation but the subsequent activities receive less emphasis due to either under-reporting or non-completion. The work shows that design practitioners need to resist the tendency for user input to taper off as projects proceed.

KW - assitive technology, inclusive design, design methods

KW - Inclusive Design

KW - assistive technology

KW - design methods

U2 - 10.2752/175630613X13584367984820

DO - 10.2752/175630613X13584367984820

M3 - Journal article

VL - 16

SP - 138

EP - 158

JO - Design Journal

JF - Design Journal

SN - 1460-6925

IS - 2

ER -